Alamitos Heights Improvement Association

In Need of a Tree?

Because the City of Long Beach has no tree replacement program, the Alamitos Heights Improvement Association has created one for all Alamitos Heights residents.  The trees are compliments of Gary De Long's office.   If you would like a new tree planted in your parkway, it's as easy as 1-2-3:

First off, go to www.longbeach.gov/pw/street_maintenance/street_trees.asp and follow the links to select the tree you would like planted from the City of Long Beach approved list.  The AHIA encourages you to consider a Southern Magnolia to keep the character of the neighborhood intact but respects your right to select the varietal of your choice.

Second, contact Brett Beck, AHIA Tree Committee Chairman at 562-233-4493 or brettdbeck@gmail.comHe will get you the City's tree approval form and submit it to the appropriate City department.

Lastly, once the city has approved your tree, Brett Beck will schedule delivery and planting of your parkway tree and give you care instructions so your tree grows up happy and healthy. 

In Alamitos Heights, the parkways are predominately lined with Southern Magnolias.  These are evergreen trees and therefore drop their leaves continuously rather than once a year.  The AHIA gets a lot of questions about the value and importance of trees in our neighborhood.  After all, they do make a mess with their leaf litter, and the roots often damage the sidewalks and curbs in the neighborhood. So, just what is the value of our Urban Forest?
A quick search of the internet shows that this question has been getting a great deal of attention lately, and some interesting answers are coming back:

  • Data from California shows that 50 million shade trees planted in strategic, energy-saving locations statewide could eliminate the need for seven 100-megawatt power plants.
  • For every ton of new wood that grows in an urban forest, about 1.5 tons of CO2 are removed from the air, reducing global warming, and 1.07 tons of oxygen is produced.
  • During a 50-year life span, one tree will generate $30,000 in oxygen, recycle $35,000 worth of water, and clean up $60,000 worth of air pollution.
  • Trees provide shade and reduce noise pollution, much to the relief of Alamitos Heights residents who like to walk our quiet streets on hot summer days.
  • Studies show that urban trees can increase property values by as much as 7% and give a neighborhood character.  So in Alamitos Heights, our tree lined streets are adding on average $60-70,000 of value to each home. 

So consider what our neighborhood would look like without them, and consider what those trees are doing for all of us by just growing in your parkway or front yard. For more information on the value of urban forests; and on caring for urban trees, visit the following links: www.treelink.org or www.treepeople.org.

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